Taymour Grahne
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Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Satellite
15.11.22 – 22.11.22
Taymour Grahne Projects
01 / 26

Group showLandscape Group Show

Artists in the show:

Adam De Boer, Amy Lincoln, Annie Hemond Hotte, Cara Nahaul, Cece Philips, Chelsea Wong, Corydon Cowansage, Diane Chappalley, Evie O'Connor, Georg Wilson, Hilary Doyle, lan Decker, Jen Hitchings, Jesse Morsberger, Joanne Kim, Lily Kemp, Matthew F Fisher, Mikey Yates, Minyoung Kim, Nat Meade, Sikelela Owen, Taedong Lee, Tessa Perutz, Zoe McGuire, Zoe Young

Exhibition Info:

address: 67 Great Titchfield Street, london w1w 7pt

dates: november 15 - 22

hours: open daily, 10am - 6pm

Taymour Grahne Projects is excited to announce the launch of LANDSCAPE, the gallery’s third Satellite group exhibition, featuring an exciting line up of 25 artists exploring the possibilities of landscape painting. The show consists of an IRL as well as an online component and is accompanied by a catalogue essay written by Dubai-based art critic, writer and editor Rahel Aima. The gallery’s Satellite exhibition program features a series of yearly offsite themed group exhibitions highlighting artists that are an integral part of the current and future cultural zeitgeist. The exhibition is opening on November 15 between 6-8pm.

Adam de Boer

June at Echo Park Lake: Morning

2022

Batik, crayon and oil paint on linen

122 x 91.4 cm. / 48 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Adam de Boer

June at Echo Park Lake: Midday

2022

Batik, crayon and oil paint on linen

122 x 91.4 cm. / 48 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Adam de Boer

June at Echo Park Lake: Evening

2022

Batik, crayon and oil paint on linen

122 x 91.4 cm. / 48 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Adam de Boer

June at Echo Park Lake: Night

2022

Batik, crayon and oil paint on linen

122 x 91.4 cm. / 48 x 36 in.

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Adam de Boer

June at Echo Park Lake: Morning, Midday, Evening, Night

2022

Batik, crayon and oil paint on linen

Total dimensions: 122 x 396 cm. / 48 x 156 in. Each panel: 122 x 91.4 cm. / 48 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Adam de Boer

Berenang Malam

2021

Wax-resist, acrylic paint staining, and oil paint on linen

137.2 x 240 cm. / 54 x 94.4 in.

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Chelsea Wong

A Vibrant Day at the Beach

2022

Acrylic on canvas

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

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Chelsea Wong

Last Swim of this Summer

2022

Acrylic on canvas

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Evie O’Connor

Kourt's No-Makeup Glow Routine

2022

Oil on panel

30.5 x 20.3 cm. / 12 x 8 in.

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Evie O’Connor

Kylie's Climate-Conscious Garden

2022

Oil on panel

30.5 x 20.3 cm. / 12 x 8 in.

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Evie O’Connor

Mastering the Art of the Sunset Shot

2022

Oil on panel

20.3 x 20.3 cm. / 8 x 8 in.

01 / 83

Sikelela Owen

Self-Portrait 1996

2022

Oil on canvas

150 x 100 cm. / 59 x 39.3 in.

01 / 83

Cece Philips

Suspension in Green

2022

Oil on canvas

Diptych, each 152.5 x 101.5 cm. / 60 x 40 in. Total 152.5 x 203 cm. / 60 x 80 in.

01 / 83

Cece Philips

Borrowed Shoes

2022

Oil on canvas

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Amy Lincoln

Leaf Tunnel

2022

Acrylic on panel

100 x 122 cm. / 39 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Amy Lincoln

Ginkgo Tree Study (Pink & Green)

2022

Acrylic on paper (framed)

20.3 x 25.4 cm. / 8 x 10 in.

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Amy Lincoln

Fir Trees & Blue Stars Study

2022

Acrylic on paper (framed)

20.3 x 25.4 cm. / 8 x 10 in.

01 / 83

Amy Lincoln

Tree Study with Orange & Purple Stars

2022

Acrylic on paper (framed)

25.4 x 20.3 cm. / 10 x 8 in.

01 / 83

Amy Lincoln

Tree Study (Orange, Purple & Cyan)

2022

Acrylic on paper (framed)

25.4 x 20.3 cm. / 10 x 8 in.

01 / 83

Minyoung Kim

Lovers Death

2022

Acrylic on un-stretched canvas (framed)

93 x 93 cm. / 36.6 x 36.6 in.

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Minyoung Kim

Fatal Attraction

2022

Acrylic on un-stretched canvas (framed)

70 x 70 cm. / 27.5 x 27.5 in.

01 / 83

Minyoung Kim

The Flower Thief

2022

Acrylic on un-stretched canvas (framed)

160 x 140 cm. / 62.9 x 55.1 in.

01 / 83

Minyoung Kim

Violet Hill

2022

Acrylic on un-stretched canvas (framed)

160 x 125 cm. / 62.9 x 49.2 in.

01 / 83

Lily Kemp

In the Beginning

2022

Acrylic on canvas

40 x 30 cm. / 15.7 x 11.8 in.

01 / 83

Lily Kemp

Every Step of the Way

2022

Acrylic on canvas

40 x 30 cm. / 15.7 x 11.8 in.

01 / 83

Nat Meade

Gust

2022

Oil on hemp

91 x 79 cm. / 36 x 31 in.

01 / 83

Nat Meade

Lier

2022

Oil on hemp

79 x 91 cm. / 31 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Ian Decker

Dead Heart Field Illusion

2022

Coupons and oil paint on wood panel

25.4 x 20.3 cm. / 10 x 8 in.

01 / 83

Ian Decker

Flowers from the Crossroad

2022

Coupon, sheet music and oil paint on wood panel

25.4 x 20.3 cm. / 10 x 8 in.

01 / 83

Ian Decker

Dollar Tree

2021

Coupons, found objects, family photos and oil paint on stretched canvas

183 x 152.5 cm. / 72 x 60 in.

01 / 83

Ian Decker

Here and There

2022

Coupons, collage material and oil paint on wood panel

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Ian Decker

Star Market Offering

2022

Coupons, collage material and oil paint on wood panel

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Corydon Cowansage

Greens

2022

Acrylic on canvas

178 x 152.5 cm. / 70 x 60 in.

01 / 83

Corydon Cowansage

Teething Crocus (Red, Turquoise, Peach)

2022

Acrylic on canvas

122 x 101.5 cm. / 48 x 40 in.

01 / 83

Annie Hemond Hotte

Labyrinth Women (Specters)

2022

Oil on canvas

130 x 110 cm. / 51.1 x 43.3 in.

01 / 83

Annie Hemond Hotte

Star Shadows (Driggs Ave)

2022

Oil on canvas

130 x 110 cm. / 51.1 x 43.3 in

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Annie Hemond Hotte

Labyrinth Woman and Horse

2022

Vinyl and oil paint on canvas

93 x 76 cm. / 36.6 x 29.9 in.

01 / 83

Annie Hemond Hotte

Labyrinth Woman Looking at a Lake

2022

Vinyl and oil paint on canvas

110.5 x 90 cm. / 43.5 x 35.4 in.

01 / 83

Jen Hitchings

Unity (Rowher Flats)

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

61 x 76 cm. / 24 x 30 in.

01 / 83

Jen Hitchings

Foggy Convergence

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

91.5 x 122 cm. / 36 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Jen Hitchings

Super Flower Blood Moon (Plum Canyon)

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

111.5 x 142 cm. / 44 x 56 in.

01 / 83

Jen Hitchings

Mirage

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

61 x 91.5 cm. / 24 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Jen Hitchings

Seed Palm Falls

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

122 x 91.5 cm. / 48 x 36 in.

01 / 83

Cara Nahaul

Pierced Sky

2021

Oil on canvas

110 x 140 cm. / 43 x 55 in.

01 / 83

Cara Nahaul

With Heavy Eyelids

2021

Oil on canvas

100 x 115 cm. / 39.3 x 45.2 in.

01 / 83

Zoe McGuire

Birth of a Galaxy

2022

Oil on canvas

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Zoe McGuire

Stellar Evolution

2022

Oil on canvas

122 x 122 cm. / 48 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Zoe McGuire

Ultraviolet

2022

Oil on canvas

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Matthew F Fisher

The Harmony of the Spheres

2022

Acrylic on canvas

89 x 106.6 cm. / 35 x 42 in.

01 / 83

Matthew F Fisher

The Depth of the Sea

2022

Acrylic on canvas

30.5 x 38 cm. / 12 x 15 in.

01 / 83

Matthew F Fisher

The Large Nadirs

2022

Acrylic on canvas

53.3 x 66 cm. / 21 x 26 in.

01 / 83

Georg Wilson

Spring Clean for the May Queen

2022

Oil on panel

120 x 160 cm. / 47.2 x 63 in.

01 / 83

Georg Wilson

Caught Red-Handed

2022

Oil on panel

70 x 100 cm. / 27.5 x 39.3 in.

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Georg Wilson

Night Crawler

2022

Oil on panel

51 x 41 cm. / 20 x 16.1 in.

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Georg Wilson

The Dream

2022

Oil on panel

51 x 41 cm. / 20 x 16.1 in.

01 / 83

Hilary Doyle

Mother and Child VIII, 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

30.5 x 22.9 cm. / 12 x 9 in.

01 / 83

Hilary Doyle

The Three Graces IV, 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

30.5 x 22.9 cm. / 12 x 9 in.

01 / 83

Hilary Doyle

Autocumulus Clouds Warn a Storm Early Spring II, 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on canvas

91.5 x 61 cm. / 36 x 24 in.

01 / 83

Hilary Doyle

Oasis VIII (After Martin Johnson Heade) Night, 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

30.5 x 22.9 cm. / 12 x 9 in.

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Hilary Doyle

Oasis IV (After Martin Johnson Heade), 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

30.5 x 22.9 cm. / 12 x 9 in.

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Hilary Doyle

Oasis VI (After Martin Johnson Heade), 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

30.5 x 22.9 cm. / 12 x 9 in.

01 / 83

Hilary Doyle

Oasis II (After Martin Johnson Heade, Approaching Thunderstorm), 10,022 ADA

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

22.9 x 30.5 cm. / 9 x 12 in.

01 / 83

Diane Chappalley

Under Story

2022

Oil on linen

45 x 55 cm. / 17.7 x 21.6 in.

01 / 83

Diane Chappalley

Under Story II

2022

Oil on linen

45 x 55 cm. / 17.7 x 21.6 in.

01 / 83

Tessa Perutz

Coastal View at Stanton Beach #1 (Marin, Northern California)

2022

Oil on canvas

71 x 56 cm. / 28 x 22 in.

01 / 83

Tessa Perutz

Colorblock Zwin Landscape in Peach and Green (Multi-Varied Perspectives)

2022

Oil on canvas

38 x 46 cm. / 15 x 18 in.

01 / 83

Joanne Kim

Stargazing

2022

Oil on canvas

109 x 142 cm. / 43 x 56 in.

01 / 83

Joanne Kim

Just Floating

2022

Oil on canvas

127 x 140 cm. / 50 x 55 in.

01 / 83

Joanne Kim

Evening Neighborhood

2022

Oil on canvas

137 x 117 cm. / 54 x 46 in.

01 / 83

Joanne Kim

Last Night Story

2022

Oil on canvas

105.5 x 81.3 cm. / 41.5 x 32 in.

01 / 83

Joanne Kim

Remorse

2022

Oil on canvas

152.5 x 122 cm. / 60 x 48 in.

01 / 83

Zoe Young

La Bimbo aka Self Portrait like a Landscape. (Video)

2022

Oil on linen

120 x 90 cm. / 47.2 x 35.4 in.

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Zoe Young

La Bimbo aka Self Portrait like a Landscape. (Cinematic)

2022

Oil on linen

190 x 130 cm. / 74.8 x 51.1 in.

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Zoe Young

La Bimbo aka Self Portrait like a Landscape. (Script)

2022

Oil on linen

60 x 40 cm. / 23.6 x 15.7 in.

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Mikey Yates

Evening Studio Commute

2022

Acrylic on wood panel

35.5 x 28 cm. / 14 x 11 in.

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Mikey Yates

Wapta Falls Plein Air

2022

Oil and acrylic on wood panel

45.7 x 35.5 cm. / 18 x 14 in.

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Taedong Lee

Red Moon

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

91 x 116.5 cm. / 35.8 x 45.8 in.

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Taedong Lee

Sunset over the Forest

2021

Oil and acrylic on canvas

116.5 x 91 cm. / 45.8 x 35.8 in.

01 / 83

Taedong Lee

In Front of the Island

2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas

162 x 92 cm. / 63.7 x 36.2 in.

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Jesse Morsberger

Going Up!

2022

Oil on canvas

117 x 137 cm. / 46 x 54 in.

01 / 83

Jesse Morsberger

Power Up

2022

Oil on canvas

101.6 x 81.2 cm. / 40 x 32 in.

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Jesse Morsberger

Galaxy

2022

Oil on canvas

76 x 71 cm. / 30 x 28 in.

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Jesse Morsberger

Fortress

2022

Oil on canvas

61 x 61 cm. / 24 x 24 in.

01 / 83

In Margaret Atwood’s 1990 story Death by Landscape, a woman named Lois sits in her Toronto apartment. She is surrounded by landscape paintings, hung salon style. The works describe restive natural scenes of woods and lakes and rivers, but produce in her a feeling of unease. Lois reminisces about the summer camp she used to attend many decades ago, an outdoorsy place of questionable First Nations LARPing and harrumphing good cheer. On a canoe trip, she peeled off with her best friend Lucy for an impromptu hike up to a lookout point. She hears a shout, then silence; the friend has melted into the landscape without a trace, like Daphne turned into a tree. This disappearance overshadows the rest of Lois’ life. She begins to collect landscapes:


“She bought them because she wanted them.

She wanted something that was in them although she could not have said at the time what it was.“


I wonder what Lois would make of this show, another room crowded with landscape paintings. I imagine her as one of the women in Cece Philips’ diptych, in which two sweater wearers, sitting on plastic lawn chairs, look out onto a verdant canopy of trees. There’s a curiously visceral sense of felt temperature: it’s sunny and, judging by the kinds of trees, quite hot outside, but you somehow know that the AC is on full blast, and if one of those figures were to lean forwards and press a palm to the plate glass, they would find it quite chilled to the touch.

Jen Hitchings’ surreal landscapes similarly play with temperature and hue. Each work is nearly monochromatic in that its palette is limited to a cool-toned colour as well as its warm toned analogue. Maroon to orange, for example, in a work whose multi-phasal moons alternatively suggests alien planets and the multi-temporality of the thangka. While the liquid pools and cascades in her other pieces here suggest otherworldly seas and waterfalls, here they invoke magmic flows or perhaps a scene that is rather more infernal: these works could equally be seen as describing the landscapes underground and inside the Earth’s crust.

Rather than Lois’ unpeopled boreal wildernesses, the works on view in LANDSCAPE span many kinds of plant life, many biomes. Take Taedong Lee’s lush, almost fauvist tropicalia and the blown-out pastel rice paddies of Cara Nahaul’s Pierced Sky (2021). They commingle with Nat Meade’s dreamy wildflower-strewn meadows and the snowy coniferous scene of Mikey Yates’ Evening Studio Commute (2022), in which a man and dog are illuminated under a streetlamp that casts the kind of burnished glow promised by sunset lamps advertised under viral tweets. Other works from Zoe McGuire gesture towards the barren reaches of outer space, while in Matthew F Fisher’s The Harmony of the Spheres, planets whirl like a Holst suite.

Some works feature wholly urban streetscapes, all cars and buildings and tarmac and carefully ordered greenery. All gardening is landscape painting, as Alexander Pope once said; by extension, all landscape painting can be considered as a kind of small-scale terraforming that prunes with paint and gesture to alter shape and form. There’s very little natural about it. I think about the way that urban planners privilege male trees when planting city pavements and meridians because they don’t drop fruit or seeds and thus reduces the need for cleanup—even if the disproportionate pollen production means misery for hayfever sufferers.

This, however, is how so many of us encounter nature today: as urban landscaping, or contained in city parks. Adam de Boer presents exactly this scenario, in a suite of paintings of one Califorrnian lake at different times of day, June at Echo Park Lake: Morning, Midday, Evening, Night (2022). Four works from Joanne Kim suggest more rural settlements, where clusters of houses are set among forests and fields, and where someone might easily reach the open outskirts of town to stargaze or take a dip in a lake. Back in the city, we have Annie Hémond Hotte’s Star Shadows (Driggs Avenue) (2022), which features stylised houses and maraca-like trees in muted blues and sagey greys. It’s the kind of thing someone might see looking out of their Brooklyn apartment window, but the flattened, slightly aerial perspective and inverted tree shadows suggest that this might instead be a scene captured by Google Maps.

It’s worth thinking here about the effects of technology on landscape painting. Just as the invention of oil paint tubes and portable easels ushered in an era of plein air painting in the 19th century, the products of today equally have their own impact on the genre. I want to emphasise the word products: the evolution of landscape painting is inextricable with the history of capitalism. This link is made explicit in Ian Decker’s tired flowers painted on panels decoupaged with supermarket coupons and sheet music, Dead Heart Field Illusion and Flowers from the Crossroad (both 2022), as well as the visual arboreal-genealogical pun of Dollar Tree (2021).

Despite this, we imbue landscape painting with a dreamy, romanticised haze associating it more with silence and the sounds of nature—some birds, a burbling stream perhaps—than blaring horns, the yells of children, and capitalist excess. Rather than the literal haze of Impressionism or Pointillism, however, in Lily Kemp’s colourful, nostalgic vistas and Tessa Perutz’s coastal dunes we see a stylisation influenced by the flat design of GUIs and computer or app icons that is popular now. After all, many of us encounter these kinds of scenes not through taking a stroll outside, but mediated through film, streaming services and even video games, as with Jesse Morsberger’s Super Mario works.

The most significant technological impact might however be linguistic. My primary association with the word landscape is not scenic vistas so much as the landscape mode of phone cameras, apps, and the various screens with which I interface on a daily basis. Landscape, then can also be understood as a framing and an orientation, a turning of the body or the screen much as a sunflower turns to face, and then follow the sun. And on a basic level, some landscape painting is just that: wider than it is high, as in Sikelela Owen's tender familial scenes.

Still—why landscape painting and why now? We tend to see the genre as capturing scenes that are somehow timeless, wholly out of time, while equally being nostalgic for the same vista’s unavoidable despoilment. Absent significant human or industrial interference, after all, a landscape might look fairly similar from one century to the next, even as phenomena like drought or soil acidification create subtler, less visible changes over time. Landscape painting has also tended to flourish with rediscovery of nature—or rather a societal reprivileging of it, as we are now seeing thanks to both the pandemic and a generalised generational anxiety about environmental degradation and the ongoing climate catastrophe.

Perhaps we need to decouple landscape and the spectre of the untouched, unpeopled natural as a first step towards considering what landscape painting looks like today. Discussing Atwood’s story in her 2022 essay collection by the same name, Elvia Wilk notes that we usually think of landscapes as passive, scenic planty backdrops for human activity. After all, landscapes are and perhaps always have been sites of projection. They exist as field or ground to set off the figures in the foreground, providing visual and allegorical ballast, a silent Greek chorus. In the Western painting tradition, idealised landscapes have been associated with moral and religious themes, from the European Renaissance through to the American concept of Manifest Destiny.

In many works, the landscape functions this way, as a foil to human subjects. The titles of Hilary Doyle’s paintings, The Three Graces IV and Mother and Child VIII (both 2022) carry these allegorical themes into the present, albeit with the addition of fruity allover prints. Some artists do however wish to redirect the viewer’s attention onto the land itself, as with Decker’s aforementioned ethnographies of human and ecological exhaustion and Georg Wilson’s vernal ode, Spring Clean for the May Queen (2022), which seems to draw as much from the Arts and Crafts movement as from folkloric and botanical knowledge. In Zoe Young’s tablescapes and in Chelsea Wong and Evie O’Connor’s paintings of beaches, pools, cruise ships, and other watery leisure activities, meanwhile, we get a sense of landscapes that are entirely shaped for human activity, even when outside.

Of young Lucy’s transformation, Wilk notes that “the sudden absence of a human actor occasions a sudden presence: the presence of landscape, the presence of plants.” It’s a refocusing of sorts, like turning a camera’s aperture ring; like the flowers that come to the fore in Diane Chappalley’s paintings. We feel this presence especially in Corydon Cowansage’s Greens in which plump, velvety pairs of the titular leaves purse together like pairs of lips and in the striking semi-abstraction of Teething Crocus (Red, Turquoise, Peach) (both 2022). It is especially strong in Amy Lincoln’s Leaf Tunnel (2022), which shows a foliaged wormhole that suggests standing inside of a hollow hedge and looking up, Minyoung Kim’s anthropomorphic cut flowers, and Zoe McGuire’s swirly floral portals or perhaps orifices.

I think of Lois describing her collection of paintings as “holes that open inward on the wall, not like windows but like doors,” and seeing her long-lost school friend in each one—there out of sight behind that tree or rocky outcrop, unseen but most certainly there. And I think of all the other women that disappear without a trace, circulating briefly on flyers and social media until they too, like Lucy, are forgotten by most, and I begin to see in each leaf here a missing girl.

- Rahel Aima